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Inhaled steroids reduce risk of lung cancer in COPD patients (Dr. Don Sin)

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) who used inhaled steroids for their breathing problems had a 30 per cent reduced risk of getting lung cancer, according to a study by University of B.C researchers. Photo courtesy of Philippa Willitts / The Vancouver Sun.
Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) who used inhaled steroids for their breathing problems had a 30 per cent reduced risk of getting lung cancer, according to a study by University of B.C researchers. Photo courtesy of Philippa Willitts / The Vancouver Sun.

Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disorder (COPD) who used inhaled steroids for their breathing problems had a 30 per cent reduced risk of getting lung cancer, according to a study by University of B.C. researchers.

The study, which was published in the European Respiratory Journal, examined 10 years of medical records for about 40,000 B.C. patients.

Inhaled corticosteroids help COPD patients breathe by controlling airway inflammation. COPD is a progressive, incurable disease that affects more than 700,000 Canadians, according to Dr. Don Sin, a study co-author and Canada Research Chair in COPD.

Read the full story on the Vancouver Sun and the Province.

Story also found on Global News, MSN News, UBC News, EurekAlert, Crag & Canyon, Yahoo News, Business Standard, and the Whig-Standard.

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