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Dr. Stuart Kreisman: Smoke-free, multi-unit dwellings: The absent centrepiece of protection from secondhand smoke (SPH Dr. Stuart Kreisman)

A strong majority of individuals would prefer to live in a 100 per cent smoke-free building, yet only a small minority have this status in British Columbia or elsewhere in Canada (Photo credit: Vancouver Sun)
A strong majority of individuals would prefer to live in a 100 per cent smoke-free building, yet only a small minority have this status in British Columbia or elsewhere in Canada (Photo credit: Vancouver Sun)

Opinion: Secondhand smoke seeps through multiple connections between units, including the ventilation system. Up to 65 per cent of the air in a unit can come from other units in the building.

This coming week is National Non-Smoking Week. Unfortunately, one of the great silent ironies of (non-pandemic) life in Vancouver and other Canadian cities today is that many of us can usually get up, take smoke-free transit to our smoke-free workplaces, afterwards eat dinner in a smoke-free restaurant, then maybe later hail a smoke-free taxicab to catch a show or game at a smoke-free venue, only to ultimately have to go back to an apartment or condominium where we are forced to breathe our neighbour’s secondhand smoke against our wills in our very own homes.

Dr. Stuart Kreisman, an endocrinologist at St. Paul’s Hospital in Vancouver, is with Physicians for a Smoke-Free Canada.

Click here for the full story on Vancouver Sun.

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