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‘The stress, the anxiety, the nightmares’: What it’s like to work in the country’s strained ICUs

Nikki Skillen is a 24-year veteran ICU nurse in the GTA. She said hospitals are now bringing nurses in from other departments to keep up with demand created by critically ill COVID patients. (Photo credit: CBC News)
Nikki Skillen is a 24-year veteran ICU nurse in the GTA. She said hospitals are now bringing nurses in from other departments to keep up with demand created by critically ill COVID patients. (Photo credit: CBC News)

Influx of third-wave patients taking huge toll on health-care workers who care for the sickest patients

Intensive care nurse Nikki Skillen says she’s losing sleep over what could happen if the number of COVID patients in her unit gets much higher.

“The amount of deaths that we could possibly see, the amount of sickness, that I can’t physically give my all to my one patient — everything I have to keep them alive — if we have hundreds of patients? I don’t know, honestly, it keeps me awake at night. This is scary,” said Skillen, who works at a Greater Toronto Area hospital.

Dr. Delbert Dorscheid, a critical care specialist at St. Paul’s Hospital and associate professor of critical care medicine at the University of British Columbia, echoes that concern. He told Dr. Goldman St. Paul’s is running at about 150-160 per cent capacity right now.

Click here for the full story on CBC News.

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