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How to exercise in the summer without heat exhaustion (Dr. Scott Lear, SPH)

Exercising in hot weather adds stress to the body and comes with risk of heat exhaustion. (Shutterstock)
Exercising in hot weather adds stress to the body and comes with risk of heat exhaustion. (Shutterstock)

With a kilometre to go, triathlete Sarah True was pulled from the 2019 Ironman European Championship in Frankfurt, Germany, due to heat exhaustion. She was in the lead by seven minutes after having swum, biked and run nearly 225 kilometres. The temperature was 38C.

With summer comes longer days and sunnier skies. It’s an opportunity to shed our winter clothes and get outside to go for a run, get on a bike or play pick-up sports with friends. Indeed, summer is when we are most active.

Written by Dr. Scott Lear, Professor of Health Sciences at Simon Fraser University.

Click here to read the story on The Sherbrooke Record

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